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Janelle Dixon, Chair, Animal Humane Society

Lisa LaFontaine, Vice Chair, Washington Humane Society

Anne Reed, Secretary, Wisconsin Humane Society

Jodi Lytle Buckman, Treasurer, ASPCA

Sharon Harmon, Past Chair, Oregon Humane Society

Madeline Bernstein, SPCA-Los Angeles

Sharon Harvey, Cleveland Animal Protective League

Mary Jarvis, Washington Animal Rescue League

Betsy McFarland, Humane Society of the United States

Shelly Moore, Humane Society of Charlotte

Gary Tiscornia, SPCA for Monterey County

Dr. Gary Weitzman, San Diego Humane Society & SPCA

Leslie Yoder, CO Federation of Animal Welfare Agencies

 

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2020 VISION INITIATIVE

Asilomar Compliant Definitions and Common Industry Terms

Definitions Resource Materials

The purpose of this document is to provide information to organizations and coalitions that are employing Asilomar as a tool to improve save rates.The information provided depicts industry language used and a representation of how it is interconnected and accepted for use by representative animal welfare organizations throughout the United States.It is intended as a resource that will aid organizations and communities in determining how best to implement the use of the Asilomar Accords to fit their circumstances.

Asilomar is a defined process for gathering and sharing statistical data about animal intake and outcomes.It was developed by a group of individuals representing varying viewpoints of the animal welfare community.Asilomar is being adopted by organizations and communities across the country to gather and report outcomes for animals in a common format.

Asilomar provides a structure and broad definitions that allow all organizations to speak a similar language when sharing statistical information.It is the first widely accepted means of gathering and tracking data.Asilomar provides a measure of consistency in reporting.It has set categories but also provides flexibility to accommodate organization and community differences.

Some of its strengths also lend to challenges.The broad definitions require communities to come to consensus on the detail within the four main categories.The detail can differ in small or significant ways from community to community when determining which medical and behavioral issues fall under which category (H, TR, TM, and UU).

The definitions and table that follow are intended as a resource to show commonly accepted practices and definitions currently used in the industry.The committee believes that a resource such as this comparison data can provide a significant advantage for communities and coalitions to see what others have done and attempt to replicate successful programs and shorten the timeline for implementation.

Asilomar Definitions

Healthy (H): The term "healthy" means and includes all dogs and cats eight weeks of age or older that, at or subsequent to the time the animal is taken into possession, have manifested no sign of a behavioral or temperamental characteristic that could pose a health or safety risk or otherwise make the animal unsuitable for placement as a pet, and have manifested no sign of disease, injury, a congenital or hereditary condition that adversely affects the health of the animal or that is likely to adversely affect the animal's health in the future.

Treatable: The term "treatable" means and includes all dogs and cats that are "rehabilitatable" and all dogs and cats that are "manageable."

Rehabilitatable (TR): The term "rehabilitatable" means and includes all dogs and cats who are not "healthy," but who are likely to become "healthy," if given medical, foster, behavioral, or other care equivalent to the care typically provided to pets by reasonable and caring pet owners/guardians in the community.

Manageable (TM): The term "manageable" means and includes all dogs and cats who are not "healthy" and who are not likely to become "healthy," regardless of the care provided; but who would likely maintain a satisfactory quality of life, if given medical, foster, behavioral, or other care, including long-term care, equivalent to the care typically provided to pets by reasonable and caring owners/guardians in the community; provided, however, that the term "manageable" does not include any dog or cat who is determined to pose a significant risk to human health or safety or to the health or safety of other animals.

Unhealthy and Untreatable (UU): The term "unhealthy and untreatable" means and includes all dogs and cats who, at or subsequent to the time they are taken into possession,

1) Have a behavioral or temperamental characteristic that poses a health or safety risk or otherwise makes the animal unsuitable for placement as a pet, and are not likely to become "healthy" or "treatable" even if provided the care typically provided to pets by reasonable and caring pet owners/guardians in the community; or

2) Are suffering from a disease, injury, or congenital or hereditary condition that adversely affects the animal's health or is likely to adversely affect the animal's health in the future, and are not likely to become "healthy" or "treatable" even if provided the care typically provided to pets by reasonable and caring pet owners/guardians in the community; or

3) Are under the age of eight weeks and are not likely to become "healthy" or "treatable," even if provided the care typically provided to pets by reasonable and caring pet owners/guardians in the community.

Other Industry Classification Terms commonly used in conjunction with the Asilomar Accords

Healthy:

  • Adoptable
  • Well Adjusted

Treatable Rehabilitatable:

  • Adoptable
  • Placeable
  • Prognosis Good
  • Prognosis Fair

Treatable Manageable

  • Adoptable
  • Placeable
  • Prognosis Good
  • Prognosis Fair
  • Prognosis Guarded(unknown outcome)

Unhealthy and Untreatable

  • Unadoptable
  • Unplaceable
  • Prognosis Poor
  • Prognosis Grave

Common Industry Definitions.

Abandoned:The intentional and/or negligent act of an owner/guardian that creates a homeless situation for a companion animal.

Adopted:The permanent transfer of ownership/guardianship of a companion animal from a shelter or rescue organization to a new owner/guardian.

Animals in Care:A physical count of animals that are in the care of a shelter, rescue organization or foster home at a specific point in time.

Euthanasia Request:Companion animal euthanasia at the specific request of the owner/guardian.

Feral: A member of a companion animal species that is not socialized to human beings, this includes animals whose usual and consistent temperament is fear and resistance to contact with people.

Foster: Temporary off-site housing and care of a companion animal, without the transfer of ownership/guardianship; ownership remains with the shelter or rescue organization.

Open Admission Shelter:An agency that must accept, or chooses to accept, any and all companion animals regardless of health, temperament, or space available, with no limitation.

Operational Strategies:Organizations have adopted various philosophical strategies under which they operate their organizations.The major classifications are:

Animal Care and Control:An agency that provides local public health, safety and law enforcement relating to animals and typically operates as a governmental agency, branch or contractor.

Limited Admission Shelter: An agency that may accept companion animals on a voluntary and/or space available basis.Admissions may be subject to health and/or temperament criteria, or any other criteria that the agency may so designate based on its mission.Generally, though not necessarily, a "No-Kill" shelter.

No Kill Shelter:Maddie's Fund defines no kill as saving both healthy and treatable dogs and cats, with euthanasia reserved only for unhealthy and untreatable animals.

Open Admission Shelter:An agency that must accept or chooses to accept, any and all companion animals regardless of health, temperament or space available, with no limitation.

Other: A reporting classification category for companion animals which are missing in action (MIA), have died, or were stolen.

Owner/Guardian:Any individual or agency that owns, possesses, keeps, exercises control over, maintains, harbors, transports, or sells a companion animal.

Relinquish:To surrender ownership/guardianship of a companion animal to an animal care or control agency.

Rescue Organization:Any licensed person or group that accepts companion animals for the purpose of finding permanent adoptive homes for the animals and does not maintain a central facility for housing companion animals, but rather uses a system of fostering in private homes, or boarding or housing in licensed companion animal facilities.

RTO:Return to owner - a companion animal reclaimed/redeemed/returned toowner/guardian.

Save Rate:Percentage of companion animals rescued by animal care and control agencies that are successfully reunited, adopted, or indefinitely residing at a shelter, foster home or sanctuary.

Shelter: .An animal shelter is typically operated as a registered 501(c) (3) non-profit humane organization or as a public animal care and control agency that provides shelter, humane standards of care and adoption services to homeless animals; are typically open to the public during at least normal business hours; and may offer a wide array of servies and programs for animals and pet owners/guardians.A shelter may be identified as a Humane Society, Animal Welfare League, Animal Protection League, Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) or other name, all generally interchangeable.

Stray:A lost companion animal in the custody of a shelter.

TNR:A program to reduce feral cat populations by trapping, sterilizing, and returning cats so they cannot reproduce; typically referred to as TNR for trap, neuter, return.

Transfer In:The acceptance of responsibility for the well being of a companion animal from one shelter or rescue organization to another.

Transfer Out:The release and assignment of responsibility for the well being of a companion animal from one shelter or rescue organization to another.

Wildlife Release:Wildlife released in the wild.

Wildlife Transfer:The acceptance of responsibility for the well being of a wild animal from one shelter to another.

We welcome your comments.If you have feedback or questions on this material or regarding our 2020 Vision or would like to share your agency/communities successes with the National Federation, please contact us using the link on the top right of each page.If you would like to join us as we work collaboratively on our 2020 Vision to end pet homelessness we encourage you to complete an application and become an active member of the National Federation of Humane Societies.



"There is a strong voice for animals when we all speak as one"(c)


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